• Updated
  • 0

Back in the “old days” it used to be that once we hit late July and the month of August, planting season was over.  Other than a few annuals, garden centers were essentially out of stock when it came to shrubs and trees. There was of course lots of harvesting to do in these months with all o…

  • Updated
  • 0

There are lots of wonderful July blooming shrubs that you can choose from when it comes to adding color and excitement to your yard, but probably the most popular one of all is the hydrangea — in all of its many variations.  There are options for full sun to full shade, some with big globes …

  • Updated
  • 0

Now that summer has arrived and we are spending more time out in our yards, it is becoming increasingly apparent that at certain times of the day we are not alone. By that I mean that the mosquitoes are out in force and looking for some sustenance. Here are some techniques and more specifica…

  • Updated
  • 0

Last year my wife and I decided it was time to move out of our 80+ year old farm house, located on the nursery property, and into a more age appropriate (not quite convalescent, but certainly geriatric) residence that had only one floor and a smaller footprint (I think this is what they call…

  • Updated
  • 0

This is the time of the year that every nursery professional has been waiting for. A year ago we carefully planned our orders from a half dozen different suppliers. We drooled over colorful glossy photos of all the new introductions. We agonized over which roses we would have room for this y…

  • Updated
  • 0

Gardening with perennials can be tricky. Unlike annuals that will bloom all summer long, perennials have their own specific blooming seasons — ranging from late winter to early spring, early summer, late summer, and even fall and winter. For the most part, perennials have a bloom period that…

  • Updated
  • 0

When it comes to plants that are sun tolerant, drought resistant, and pretty much maintenance free, nothing can compare to sedums. They are a group of plants that fit nicely into rockeries, spill over retaining walls, blended into sunny mixed borders, and are great just about anywhere where …

  • Updated
  • 0

Whatever your reason is for feeling moved to plant a vegetable garden in these times of turmoil, it’s a good idea. It is good to get out in the fresh air, get some exercise and any time spent in the garden can be therapeutic. Good intentions are all fine and good, but without positive result…

  • Updated
  • 0

April is always a busy month for gardeners, with a multitude of chores clamoring for our attention.  In the case of our lawns, April is possibly the most critical month to get back on track.  Here are some things to consider for a healthy and beautiful lawn…

  • Updated
  • 0

As we all are being forced to stay at home and keep our social distance when out and about, it has become apparent to me that a heck of a lot of people are taking advantage of this time and working in their yards!  I have never seen so many lawns neatly mowed and flower beds weeded so early …

  • Updated
  • 0

Unless you have been living under a rock, you should be aware by now of the importance of bees (and insects in general for that matter) on our ecosystem. They are our chief pollinators, along with wasps and flies, some moths and butterflies, and even hummingbirds and bats. In the early seaso…

  • Updated
  • 0

Last week I mentioned that it was time to plant your “cool season” vegetables.  In the northwest especially, we have two distinct seasons to plant veggies. Right now is the cool season, when the soils are still cold and an occasional frost can be expected to coat our roofs and lawns. Crops l…

  • Updated
  • 0

Sometimes I feel like the world is spinning out of control. There is all the fear over the coronavirus, the political turmoil over the November elections, concerns over climate change, the stock market, March Madness (okay, maybe that isn’t a life or death issue), and just general angst over…

  • Updated
  • 0

When I think of the word “wallflower” or “shrinking violet” for that matter, I conjure up an image in my mind of a timid plant that is shy and socially challenged. It is not very flashy and prefers to grow in an obscure location where it will be barely noticed by the passing visitor.  In rea…

  • Updated
  • 0

There is no doubt in my mind that spring has sprung. This indisputable fact lies in the discovery this week of the first white blooms on a wild plum tree that lives down the street from the nursery. On that same road, I caught a glance of the swelling buds of several Bradford flowering pears…

  • Updated
  • 0

It’s that time of year again when garden centers fill their benches back up with a whole new crop of bare root roses. Our crews have spent the last several weeks carefully pruning and planting several thousand of them so they can be taken home and lovingly plunged into your gardens. Please r…

  • Updated
  • 0

Traditionally speaking, Valentine’s Day is the “Christmas” season for florists, whereas Mother’s Day belongs to the garden centers. However, not being one to follow tradition, I am going to take this space to help you stretch the envelope, so to speak. Here are some suggestions, not to repla…

  • 0

It should be no surprise that our northwest climate is perfect for growing all kinds of berries. Simply look around at the omnipresent and noxious Himalayan Blackberry, and one can easily deduce that berries will grow with little effort on our part. The presence of vast commercial fields of …

  • Updated
  • 0

Let’s face it, compared to other regions of our country, we have it pretty darn good when it comes to winter.  Occasional snow rarely sticks around for more than a week or two, nighttime lows are usually above freezing and the day temps can even get up into the 50’s.  Nothing stays dormant f…

  • Updated
  • 0

Believe it or not, by the end of this month garden centers will be fully stocked with all the new and tried and true varieties of fruit trees that are well-suited for our unique marine climate. For the most part, these trees will be bare root — which simply means that the roots have no soil …

  • Updated
  • 0

It looks like the next couple of weeks are going to be wet and cold and some preparation on our parts can help minimize any deleterious effects. We rarely see more than 10 to 14 days of continuous below freezing weather during the winter, but despite its short duration, it can do a lot of da…

  • Updated
  • 0

I have just spent this last week, and countless hours, researching the topic of "trends for 2020’’ in hopes of bringing you something of deep profundity. Unfortunately, I have to confess; it has been a struggle to find the perfect morsels of wisdom for your reading pleasure and I have come t…

  • 0

I know it is crunch time for gift buying and you might still have a few tough ones to figure out. Avoid the crazy mall madness and have an actual tactile experience of touching the gifts you’re searching for (to maybe even be hand-wrapped with care, rather than just clicking a mouse for an o…

  • Updated
  • 0

I have mentioned many times over the years that I believe that we live in a horticultural paradise.  There is very little we can’t grow successfully in our Pacific Northwest climate and lord knows I have tried it all at one time or another. Paw Paws were once on my list, but no longer. Persi…

  • Updated
  • 0

If you are the type that visits a garden center on a regular basis, then you have probably noticed that plants have their seasons. Primroses, for example, are typically only available for a short time in late winter and very early spring. Most blooming plants will be featured front and cente…

  • Updated
  • 0

As the season winds down and the garden is put to bed, I can’t help but pause and reflect on the past several months. It was a roller coaster year for me with lots of promise, a major setback, and then a fantastic recovery. 

  • Updated
  • 0

As gardeners, the concept of “going natural” is nothing new. Whatever our reasons, whenever practical we tend to shy away from synthetics and instead choose products that are natural. In the case of Christmas trees we have the same choices — one is buying an artificial tree, and the other is…

  • Updated
  • 0

Back in late September of this year, I introduced you to several new shrubs for 2020 and promised to continue later this fall with several more new introductions. After reading through the November/December edition of Horticulture (one of many gardening magazines that my wife and I subscribe…

  • 0

It’s been a while since I have given you a concise, all-in-one-place list of chores for the month, so I thought it would be timely to do just that. There is always something to do in the garden, even if it is just walking around and observing what Mother Nature is up to. As stewards of the g…

  • Updated
  • 0

As the temperatures continue to drop, along with all those leaves on our deciduous trees, we are pretty much left with just shades of green in our gardens to look at throughout the winter.  There are, of course, quite a few winter-blooming perennials and shrubs that can add some winter inter…

  • Updated
  • 0

I think it is fair to say that the dark season is upon us and it seems to have arrived a couple of months early.  September and October have both been unusually wet, which always cuts down on my time to spend in the garden and subsequently, prematurely kicks off my seasonal affect disorder, …

  • Updated
  • 0

First off, I suspect you would like an explanation of what the heck is a “bud-blooming” heather. It’s a fair question so here is my answer:  A bud-blooming heather is a type of Calluna (a commonly planted summer-blooming heather that is in many of our gardens) whose buds never fully open but…

  • 0

With the mercury dipping down into the low thirties, and maybe even some frost for some of you, I am reminded of the often asked question: “How do I save some of my seasonal color for the next season”. It’s only a matter of time before a really good hard frost is going to make that question …

  • Updated
  • 0

Of all the seasons of the year, fall is probably my most favorite and the month of October is when it all starts to happen (although this year one could argue that fall actually started in September). There is a crispness in the air, new vibrant colors on the trees, fresh growth on our summe…

  • 0

We have a vast palette of plants to choose from for our northwest gardens, and in many cases they come from the same genus. The genus Pinus for instance includes eastern white, Japanese white, red, black, Swiss, Ponderosa, mugo, and so on and so forth. These are all different species within …

  • 0

Back in March of this year, I introduced you to several new plants for the 2019 season that were sure to be hits in your garden. There was a landscape rose called ‘At Last’ that actually sported some fragrance - something that had been sorely missing with past landscape/shrub roses. If you m…

  • Updated
  • 0

I recently read an article on designing with foliage in the garden by a local author, Christina Salwitz.  She has written two books: “Fine Foliage” from St. Lynn’s Press and “Gardening with Foliage First” from Timber Press — I highly recommend reading both of them.  Her main point is that wh…

  • Updated
  • 0

As we move into the fall season and our summer bloomers start to fade, it is encouraging to know that there are still quite a few choices for late color in our gardens. The classic fall blooming perennials are of course mums and asters, which sadly seem to have been relegated to the status o…

  • 0

If you are like me, you are probably sick and tired of dragging hoses all over the garden, mowing the lawn and pulling weeds. Understandably, there is a tendency for us to slack off on these chores as fall approaches, but letting the garden go to seed is never a good idea when it comes to we…

  • 0

Ornamental grasses are an interesting class of perennials.  They have some unique qualities that make them an essential part of my borders, as they should yours. Unfortunately, many gardeners still see them as weeds that either need to be sprayed with Roundup or trimmed with the Weed-Eater. …

  • 0

Last week I mentioned that August was a good time to plant all sorts of plants, but I failed to mention vegetables. It might seem hard to imagine that in the heat of August we would be planting vegetable crops that thrive in the cooler time of the year, but in reality this is the time to get…

  • Updated
  • 0

August can be a surprisingly busy month in the garden.  There are timely chores, if attended to this month, that will improve the look and health of our plants. Here they are for your reading pleasure.

  • Updated
  • 0

There is an old expression that goes like this: “Doctors bury their mistakes, architects plant ivy." Admittedly, this is a crude analogy but it is very true that vines can cover a multitude of sins. Perhaps a more positive way to put it is that vines have the ability to soften the edges of o…

  • Updated
  • 0

Anyone who has followed me over the years knows that one of my many mantras is “There is always room for one more plant”.  No matter how packed my garden is, on any given day I can find a little patch of bare earth that is just screaming for something to be planted in it.  My wife often fond…

  • 0

I know I mentioned last week that I always hesitate to spend too much ink on just one variety of plant, so it was my intention to discuss some summer chores for us to complete this month. However, I found myself distracted by an article in the September edition of my wife’s ‘The English Gard…

  • 0

It is always hard for me to focus in on one variety of plant this time of year.  There are so many fabulous summer blooming perennials (and a surprising number of shrubs) that are strutting their stuff in the months of July and August, that to dedicate a whole column to one variety seems imp…

  • Updated
  • 0

If you are looking for a perennial that will bloom from June until frost, will tolerate full sun or part shade, comes back every spring (unless Mother Nature is really nasty to us) and makes a wonderful companion to so many other plants, then what you need is a hardy fuchsia. They are hard t…

  • 0

July is a very busy month for me in my garden and it should be for you as well. This is the month I like to put the finishing touches on everything, so all I have to do for the rest of the summer is water and enjoy the fruits of my labor. Here are some things we should all be focused on.

  • 0

There is a certain fact that northwest gardeners are going to have to start embracing: our summers are getting longer and drier and our plants are only going to get more and more moisture stressed.  It is up to us to help our landscapes get through the summer months, so here are the basics o…

  • 0

I couldn’t help but notice the other day while driving around town, that lavender was coming into bloom. That of course got me thinking about growing lavender, choosing varieties, and how to actually use the plant other than just to look at it. It turns out lavender has been in production fo…