Animals0123

Stillaguamish Valley Learning Center students brought their learning to life on Oct. 9 by seeing some animals they’ve been learning about as part of their science curriculum.

 

Stillaguamish Valley Learning Center (SVLC) students brought their learning to life on Oct. 9 by seeing some animals they’ve been learning about as part of their science curriculum. Staff from the Sarvey Wildlife Care Center brought a peregrine falcon, turkey vulture, and great horned owl to the school for the students to observe.

“We have developed an enriching Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math (STEAM) unit around owls to teach the students about adaptation and adaptability,” said Cheryl Anderton, K-5 SVLC instructor who coordinated the visit. “This hands-on learning helps reinforce the lessons the students have been studying.”

The Sarvey staff showed the animals to the students and explained their characteristics. Owls have wings with serrated edges that makes them silent flyers and immovable eyes which take up about 70 percent of their skull space to give them extraordinary vision at night. These adaptations have helped owls survive in their environment.  

Sarvey staff also talked about conservation with the students and how it impacts the animals.

“One of the animals was hit by a vehicle when trash on the side of the road attracted rodents, which in turn attracted the animal,” said Elise Koszarek, Sarvey Raptor Program Coordinator. “We explained to the students how important it is not to litter and pick up trash so wildlife isn’t impacted.”

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