North County Outlook - Community newspaper serving Marysville, Arlington, Tulalip, Smokey Point, Lakewood

Quil Ceda Village - Favorite Neighborhood Stores

Students study seeds that have been to space

Haller science students participate in tomato seed project that may help astronauts grow food in space

 

Courtesy of Arlington Public Schools

Over the past month, sixth-grade science students at Haller Middle School have been studying tomato seeds that have gone to space to see how they grow in Earth's atmosphere.

They're seeds that have gone where no seed has gone before. Over the past month, sixth-grade science students at Haller Middle School have been studying tomato seeds that have gone to space to see how they grow in Earth's atmosphere.

The students studied two sets of tomato seeds - one set that went to space and one that didn't. The students didn't know which set was which and had to predict which one would grow better. The students discovered that the space seeds grew significantly faster than the Earth-bound seeds.

"I was very surprised to see how much faster the space seeds grew," said sixth-grader Kiah Hoekema. "It was really cool to grow something that had come from space."

The Tomatosphere Project is an international study exploring the effects of space on tomato seeds. Haller applied to the study and was accepted. The Canadian Space Agency sent both sets of seeds to Haller. The space seeds spent six weeks on the International Space Station while undergoing conditions of microgravity, low oxygen levels and frigid temperatures. Haller will send their results to the space agency to be used to help with growing food in space and the mission to Mars.

The sixth-grade science curriculum has been continually evolving to align with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), a new set of science standards that have been adopted by the state. The NGSS describe what each student should know in the four domains of science: physical science; life science; earth and space science; and engineering, technology and science application.

"Space really engages students and space has been part of the curriculum for the whole year," said sixth-grade science teacher Rachel Harrington. "We studied physics, rocketry, moon phases and Mars. We also involved seventh- and eighth-grade students and asked them to predict which set of seeds would grow faster based on the evidence gathered by the sixth-graders."

"The results were really surprising," said sixth-grader Bree Sanchez. "It's been fun learning about space this year."

 

Reader Comments
(0)

 
 

Powered by ROAR Online Publication Software from Lions Light Corporation
© Copyright 2018